Courses

Course Listings Academic Year 2016-2017

Spring 2017 Russian Course Listings

Anthropology
ANTH 438/638: Culture, Power, Oil
Douglas Rogers (W 9:25-11:15)
The production, circulation, and consumption of petroleum as they relate to globalization, empire, cultural performance, natural resource extraction, and the nature of the state. Case studies include the United States, Saudi Arabia, Nigeria, Venezuela, and the former Soviet Union.
 
European & Russian Studies

ER&S 510: Central Asia in International Affairs
Douglas Rogers (W 9:25-11:15)
This course examines the recent history and current situation in the five states of core Central Asia. Internal developments inside the region are considered, as well as policies of key global and regional players. The goal is to understand the way local and outside players interact with each other and pursue their interests in the context of locally mixed global, regional and country dynamics. The goal is also to understand the current and possible future roles of Central Asia in global and regional order.

Global Affairs
GLBL 290/693: U.S.-Russian Relations Since 1989
Thomas Graham (M 1:30-3:20)
Examination of the factors, political, socio-economic, and ideological, that have shaped United States and Russian relations since the end of the Cold War and how each country constructs relations with the other to advance its own national interests. Topics include specific issues in bilateral relations, including arms control, counterterrorism, energy, and regional affairs. 
 
GLBL 883: Stability in Central & Eastern Europe
Yuriy Sergeyev (W 1:30-3:20)
This course examines the geopolitical, political, military, socioeconomic, and ideological factors that are challenging security and stability in the region of Central and Eastern Europe after collapse of the USSR. The goal is to give students a broad understanding of the reasons for the worsening security and stability in the region, particularly the Baltic states, Visegrad states, and GUAM member states, and to model further potential developments. The influence of the global players—United States, European Union, Russia—on the security situation in the region is considered.
 
History
HIST 237: Russian Culture: the Modern Age
Paul Bushkovitch, John MacKay (MW 1:30-2:20)
An interdisciplinary exploration of Russian cultural history, focusing on literature, art, religion, social and political thought, and film. Conceptions of Russian nationhood; the myths of St. Petersburg; dissent and persecution; the role of social and cultural elites; the intelligentsia; attitudes toward the common people; conflicting appeals of rationality, spirituality, and idealism; the politicization of personal life; the impact of the Bolshevik Revolution and its aftermath.
 
HIST 264: Eastern Europe since 1914
Timothy Snyder (TTh 2:30-3:20)
Eastern Europe from the collapse of the old imperial order to the enlargement of the European Union. Main themes include world war, nationalism, fascism, and communism. Special attention to the structural weaknesses of interwar nation-states and postwar communist regimes. Nazi and Soviet occupation as an age of extremes. The collapse of communism. Communism after 1989 and the dissolution of Yugoslavia in the 1990s as parallel European trajectories.
 
HIST 683: Global History of Eastern Europe
Timothy Snyder (Th 9:25-11:15)
A thematic survey of major issues in modern east European history, with emphasis on recent historiography. A reading course with multiple brief writing assignments.
 
HIST 684/RUSS 620: Russian History Memoirs, 1750-1920
Paul Bushkovitch (T 1:30-3:20)
The main trends in Russian history seen in the memoirs of the actors at various levels of society, from Catherine the Great to the Revolution. The advantages and limits of memoirs as sources, and their importance in Russian culture.
 
Russian
RUSS 022: The Divine & Human in Russian Fiction TR
Vladimir Alexandrov (T 1:30-3:20)
A study of major works by several of the greatest writers in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russian literature: Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Bely, Nabokov, and Bulgakov. Primary attention to the ways the authors embody in their themes, devices, and forms the link between the human realm and the transcendent, a central preoccupation of Russian culture. 
 
RUSS 120: First-Year Russian II
Julia Titus (multiple)
Continuation of RUSS 110.
 
RUSS 140: Second-Year Russian II
Irina Dolgova (M-F 10:30-11:20)
Continuation of RUSS 130.
 
RUSS 142: Russian for Bilingual Students II
Julia Titus (MW 11:35-12:50)
Continuation of RUSS 122. Further development of reading and writing skills. Expansion of vocabulary.
 
RUSS 145: Intensive Intermediate Russian
Constantine Muravnik (MWF 9:25-10:15 MTWThF 10:30-11:20)
A continuation of RUSS 125 that covers in one term the material taught in RUSS 130 and 140. For students of superior linguistic ability.
 
RUSS 151: Third-Year Russian II
Constantine Muravnik (MWF 11:35-12:25)
Continuation of RUSS 150.
 
RUSS 161: Fourth-Year Russian II
Irina Dolgova (MWF 11:35-12:25 )
Continuation of RUSS 160.
 
RUSS 185: Advanced Russian Conversation & Composition
Irina Dolgova (MW 1:00-2:15)
Development of advanced language skills in composition, comprehension, and conversation. Includes grammar review and discussion of Russian stylistics. Readings from a range of contemporary media and Internet sources. 
 
RUSS 253: Masterpieces of Russian Literature II TR
Hilary Fink (TTh 11:35-12:50)
A survey of major writers and literary movements, focusing on the intersection of art and revolution in twentieth-century Russian literature. The Symbolists and Decadents at the end of the nineteenth century; the reception of the 1917 Revolution by Russian writers in the 1920s; the formation of Stalinist literary orthodoxy and reactions against it; contemporary literary rebellions against the political and artistic legacies of the past. Works by Chekhov, Bely, Babel, Akhmatova, Bulgakov, Pasternak, and Pelevin.
 
RUSS 254/LITR 245/RSEE 254: Novels of Tolstoy and Dostoevsky
Vladimir Alexandrov (MW 1:30-2:20)
Close reading of major novels by two of Russia’s greatest authors. Focus on the interrelations of theme, form, and literary-cultural context. Readings and discussion in English.
 
RUSS 390/FILM 383: Media & Revolution Since 1917
John MacKay (W 9:25-11:15)
Review of one hundred years of cultural production informed by the idea of social revolution. Consideration of works by Sergei Eisenstein, Esther Shub, Dziga Vertov, Sun Yu, Jean-Luc Godard, Jorge Sanjines, Chris Marker, Aldo Garay, and Hanna Polak. Topics include propaganda and agitation; modernity and capitalism as political categories; masses, classes, collectivities, parties and states; gender and political change; ownership of and control over media; politics and media shifts; and the notion of revolution and its implications for artistic practice.
 
RUSS 607: Topics in Russian Literature: Origins - 18th Century
Harvey Goldblatt (T 9:25-11:15)
Representative works, mostly selected from “old” Russian “bookish writing,” but also from the “new” Russian literature of the seventeenth and first half of the eighteenth century, are examined against a broad comparative background to illustrate the development of various literary types and writing techniques. Special attention is devoted to diverse historiographic and methodological approaches; traditional and innovative theories of literary expression; and the connections between writing activity and ideological trends.
 
RUSS 644: Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, & the Novel
Molly Brunson (Th 2:30-4:20)
An examination of the place of Dostoevsky and Tolstoy in the history and theory of the novel. Topics include modernity and the rise of the novelistic genre; narrative and description, time and space; novelistic form and discourse; psychological interiority and the elaboration of the self; the Realist novel, the Bildungsroman, and the epic; limits of novelistic representation. Alongside a selection of novels and contemporaneous critical and theoretical texts, we read the central works of twentieth-century novel theory by Bakhtin, Lukács, and others.
 
RUSS 671: Arts in Russia: Reform - Revolution
Molly Brunson (T 1:30-3:20)
During the second half of the long nineteenth century, Russia experienced an unprecedented flourishing of the arts, evolving rapidly from a country with a relatively young literary tradition and few cultural institutions to one that witnessed the likes of Tolstoy and Dostoevsky, the Mighty Five, the Peredvizhniki, and the Ballets Russes. Imperial Russian culture, and especially from the era of reform to the revolution (1855–1917), has served as the foundation for a national canon and a global artistic reputation, its legacy felt in the Russian avant-garde and official Soviet culture alike, and even in the recent recasting of a twenty-first-century national identity. This seminar considers Russian literature, visual arts, music, and drama in their social, historical, and political contexts, and also across a broad historical scope and alongside criticism with a range of disciplinary perspectives. Russia’s conflicted position between East and West, as both part of and apart from Western culture, motivates a number of the course’s driving questions. How does Russia’s particular experience of modernity impact cultural forms and institutions, and what distinguishes Russia’s national manifestations of realism, modernism, and symbolism? How do the arts balance a commitment to pan-European culture with the often self-conscious project of developing a robust national tradition? How is Russian culture introduced to the West, and to what end? How do the various arts experience the transition from the fin de siècle to the Soviet period, and how is this transition represented in Soviet and Western historiography? What constitutes the legacy of “the Russians” in the twentieth century and today? Special attention is also given to questions of aesthetics, form, and genre, as well as to the uneven development and different roles of literature, long considered the dominant art in Russia, and the nonverbal arts. The course concludes with a study trip to Russia after the end of the term. Enrollment limited.
 
Slavic
SLAV 805: History of the Russian Literary Language
Harvey Goldblatt (W 1:30-3:10)
Examination of the different types of “Russian literary language” (RLL) employed, from the Time of Troubles at the beginning of the seventeenth century to the age of Vladimir Putin in the early twenty-first century. Particular attention is placed on the nexus between literary language and cultural history, the significance of interpretive traditions and fundamental language beliefs that conditioned the formation of the modern RLL, the links between literary codification and stylistic techniques, and the relations between RLL and other modern Slavic literary languages (especially Ukrainian and Belarusian).

Course Listings Previous Semesters

Fall 2016 Russian Course Listings

History
HIST 263: History of Eastern Europe to 1914
Timothy Snyder (TTh 2:30-3:20)
Eastern Europe from the medieval state to the rise of modern nationalism. The Ottoman Empire, the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, the Hapsburg monarchy, and various native currents. Themes include religious diversity, the constitution of empire, and the emergence of secular political ideologies. 
 
HIST 290: Russia from the 9th Century to 1801
Paul Bushkovitch (MW 11:35-12:50)
The mainstream of Russian history from the Kievan state to 1801. Political, social, and economic institutions and the transition from Eastern Orthodoxy to the Enlightenment. 
 
HIST 687: Russia, USSR, & the World 1855-1945
Paul Bushkovitch (T 1:30-3:20)
Political and economic relations of Russia/Soviet Union with Europe, the United States, and Asia from tsarism to socialism.
 
Russian
RUSS 110: First-Year Russian I
Julia Titus, Minjin Hashbat (multiple)
A video-based course designed to develop all four language skills: reading, writing, speaking, and listening comprehension. Use of dialogues, games, and role playing. In addition to readings in the textbook, students read original short stories and learn Russian songs and poems. Oral and written examinations. 
 
RUSS 122: Russian for Bilingual Students I
Julia Titus (MW 11:35-12:50)
A comprehensive Russian course for native speakers of Russian or other Slavic languages whose formal education has been in English. Overview of Russian grammar, focusing on the writing system, cases, conjunction, and syntax. Readings from Russian prose, film screenings, discussion, and regular practice in translation and composition.
 
RUSS 125: Intensive Elementary Russian
Constantine Muravnik (MWF 9:25-10:15 MTWThF 10:30-11:20)
An intensive course that covers in one term the material taught in RUSS 110 and 120. For students of superior linguistic ability. Study of Russian grammar; practice in conversation, reading, and composition. 
 
RUSS 130: Second-Year Russian I
Irina Dolgova (M-F 10:30-11:20)
A course to improve functional competence in all four language skills (speaking, writing, reading, and listening comprehension). Audio activities, for use both in the classroom and independently, are designed to help students improve their listening comprehension skills and pronunciation. Lexical and grammatical materials are thematically based. 
 
RUSS 145: Intensive Intermediate Russian
Constantine Muravnik (MWF 9:25-10:15 MTWThF 10:30-11:20)
A continuation of RUSS 125 that covers in one term the material taught in RUSS 130 and 140. For students of superior linguistic ability.
 
RUSS 150: Third-Year Russian I
Constantine Muravnik (MWF 11:35-12:25)
Intensive practice in conversation and composition accompanied by review and refinement of grammar. Readings from nineteenth- and twentieth-century literature, selected readings in Russian history and current events, and videotapes and films are used as the basis of structured conversation, composition, and grammatical exercises. Oral and written examinations. 
 
RUSS 160: Fourth-Year Russian I
Irina Dolgova (MWF 11:35-12:25)
Discussion topics include Russian culture, literature, and self-identity; the old and new capitals of Russia, the cultural impact of the Russian Orthodox Church, and Russia at war. Readings from mass media, textbooks, and classic and modern literature. Use of video materials. 
 
RUSS 220: Russian & Soviet Art, 1757-Present TR
Molly Brunson (MW 2:30-3:20)
The history of Russian and Soviet art from the foundation of the Academy of the Arts in 1757 to the present. Nineteenth-century academicism, romaticism, and realism; the Russian avant-garde and early Soviet experimentation; socialist realism and late- and post-Soviet culture. 
 
RUSS 250: Masterpieces of Russian Literature I TR
Hilary Fink (MW 1:30-2:20)
Introduction to major texts of the nineteenth-century Russian literary tradition. Works by Pushkin, Gogol, Lermontov, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Chekhov examined in their social and historical contexts. Emphasis on the authors’ use of genre, language, and literary devices to explore pressing questions posed by Russian modernity. 
 
RUSS 327: The Danube in Literature & Film TR
Marijeta Bozovic (TTh 2:30-3:45)
The Danube River in the film, art, and literature of various Danubian cultural traditions, from the late nineteenth century to the present. Geography and history of the region that includes the river’s shores and watershed; physical, historical, and metaphoric uses of the Danube; the region as a contested multilingual, multicultural, and multinational space, and as a quintessential site of cross-cultural engagement. Readings and discussion in English.
 
RUSS 333: The Living Dead in Literature TR
Molly Brunson (MW 11:35-12:50)
A study of ghosts, vampires, cyborgs, animated artworks, and other supernatural beings in Slavic, western European, and American literature and culture. The thematic, historical, and epistemological significance of violating the border between life and death in art. Analysis of novels, short stories, folklore, visual arts, and theoretical texts. Readings and discussion in English.
 
RUSS 384: Avant-Gardes and Emigres (DH Lab)
Marijeta Bozovic (TTh 11:35-12:50)
A highly collaborative seminar to study the work of influential Russian artists, writers, and thinkers of the twentieth century and to introduce students to new ways of conducting and presenting research, using digital tools. Frequent meetings in the Beinecke Library and Digital Humanities Lab in Sterling Memorial Library.
 
RUSS 696: Post-Stalin Literature & Film
Katerina Clark (W 1:30-3:20)
The main developments in Russian and Soviet literature and film from Stalin’s death in 1953 to the present.
 
Slavic
SLAV 202: Old Church Slavic
Harvey Goldblatt (T 9:25-11:15)
A study of Old Church Slavic and its place in the history of Church Slavic. The main features and the grammar of Old Church Slavic. The Glagolitic and Cyrillic writing systems. Close readings from Old Church Slavic literary monuments. Old Church Slavic in relation to modern Slavic languages (especially Russian). 
 

Spring 2016 Russian Course Listings 

Anthropology
ANTH424/624: Political Anthropology of Russia and Its Neighbors
Douglas Rogers (M 1.30-3.20)
Consideration of political life in the territory of the former Soviet Union, with an emphasis on fieldwork-based studies. Topics include mafias, petrostates, wars and conflict, clan-based politics, protest movements, religion, power and gender, corruption, legacies of the Soviet period, and the power of corporations.
 
ANTH 438/638: Culture, Power, Oil
Douglas Rogers (W 9:25-11:15)
The production, circulation, and consumption of petroleum as they relate to globalization, empire, cultural performance, natural resource extraction, and the nature of the state. Case studies include the United States, Saudi Arabia, Nigeria, Venezuela, and the former Soviet Union.
 
Global Affairs
GLBL 290/693: U.S.-Russian Relations Since 1989
Thomas Graham (T 1:30-3:20)
Examination of the factors, political, socio-economic, and ideological, that have shaped United States and Russian relations since the end of the Cold War and how each country constructs relations with the other to advance its own national interests. Topics include specific issues in bilateral relations, including arms control, counterterrorism, energy, and regional affairs.
 
History
HIST 222J: Russia and the Eurasian Steppe
Paul Bushkovitch (W 1:30-3:20)

A study of Russia’s interaction with the nomads of the Eurasian steppe. Topics include the Mongol invasion, the Mongol Empire in Asia and the Golden Horde, Islam, nomadic society, and the Russian state. Focus on conquest and settlement. 

HIST 235J: Existentialism and Dissent
Marci Shore (M 1:30-3:20)

Intellectual history of twentieth-century Europe, focusing on existentialist philosophy and its confrontation with Marxism in theory and with communist regimes in practice.

HIST 237: Russian Culture: the Modern Age
Paul Bushkovitch, John MacKay (TTh 1:30-2:20)

An interdisciplinary exploration of Russian cultural history, focusing on literature, art, religion, social and political thought, and film. Conceptions of Russian nationhood; the myths of St. Petersburg; dissent and persecution; the role of social and cultural elites; the intelligentsia; attitudes toward the common people; conflicting appeals of rationality, spirituality, and idealism; the politicization of personal life; the impact of the Bolshevik Revolution and its aftermath.

HIST 264: Eastern Europe Since 1914
Timothy Snyder (TTh 2:30-3:20)

Eastern Europe from the collapse of the old imperial order to the enlargement of the European Union. Main themes include world war, nationalism, fascism, and communism. Special attention to the structural weaknesses of interwar nation-states and postwar communist regimes. Nazi and Soviet occupation as an age of extremes. The collapse of communism. Communism after 1989 and the dissolution of Yugoslavia in the 1990s as parallel European trajectories.

HIST 271: Intellectual History Since Nietzsche
Marci Shore (MW 10:30-11:20)

Major currents in European intellectual history from the late nineteenth century through the twentieth. Topics include Marxism-Leninism, psychoanalysis, expressionism, structuralism, phenomenology, existentialism, antipolitics, and deconstruction. 

HIST 274J: Stalin and the Soviet Union 1920-1939
Sara Brinegar (Th 1:30-3:20)

The Soviet Union under Joseph Stalin, including the violent collectivization of agriculture, rapid industrialization, the Great Terror, and the introduction of mass education and literacy. The creation of the Stalinist state and the so-called revolution from above; how people lived and understood the Soviet experience; achievements sought by the Soviet experiment; the relationship between Leninism and Stalinism.

HIST 275J/FILM 368/MGRK 233: Culture of the Cold War in Europe
George Syrimis (F 1:30-3:20)

European culture during and after the Cold War. Focus on the relation of politics and dominant ideologies to their correlative literary and cinematic aesthetics models and to popular culture. Themes include totalitarianism, Eurocommunism, decolonization, espionage, state surveillance, the nuclear threat, sports, and propaganda.

HIST 678: Russia 1598-1725
Paul Bushkovitch (W 1:30-3:20)

State, society, and religion in a period of upheaval and transformation.

HIST 683: Global History of Eastern Europe
Timothy Snyder (Th 9:25-11:15)

A thematic survey of major issues in modern east European history, with emphasis on recent historiography. A reading course with multiple brief writing assignments.

Russian
RUSS 023: Storytelling and the Russian Tradition
Bella Grigoryan (MW 1:00-2:15)

An introduction to modern Russian literature via the genre of the short story. A sustained examination of the relationship between various modes of storytelling and modern literature. Emphasis on the aesthetic and ideological uses of storytelling in masterpieces of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Russian prose fiction.

RUSS 120: First-Year Russian II
Julia Titus (multiple)

Continuation of RUSS 110.

RUSS 140: Second-Year Russian II
Irina Dolgova (M-F 10:30-11:20)

Continuation of RUSS 130

RUSS 142: Russian for Bilingual Students II
Julia Titus (MW 11:35-12:50)

Continuation of RUSS 122. Further development of reading and writing skills. Expansion of vocabulary.

RUSS 145: Intensive Intermediate Russian
Constantine Muravnik (MWF 9:25-10:15 MTWThF 10:30-11:20)

A continuation of RUSS 125 that covers in one term the material taught in RUSS 130 and 140. For students of superior linguistic ability.

RUSS 151: Third-Year Russian II
Constantine Muravnik (MWF 11:35-12:25)

Continuation of RUSS 150.

RUSS 161: Fourth-Year Russian II
Irina Dolgova (MW 11:35-12:25)

Continuation of RUSS 160.

RUSS 178: The Russian Short Story
Julia Titus (MWF 11:35-12:25)

Chronological study of celebrated Russian short stories. Authors include Pushkin, Gogol, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Chekhov, Nabokov, and Tolstaya. Readings and discussion in Russian. 

RUSS 254/LITR 245/RSEE 254: Novels of Tolstoy and Dostoevsky
Vladimir Alexandrov (MW 3:30-4:20)

Close reading of major novels by two of Russia’s greatest authors. Focus on the interrelations of theme, form, and literary-cultural context. Readings and discussion in English.

RUSS 316: Russian Literature and Western Philosophy
Hilary Fink (T 1:30-3:20)

Intensive analysis of Dostoevsky’s Notes from the Underground, Tolstoy?s The Death of Ivan Il’ich and The Cossacks, and selected short stories by Chekhov. The works are examined through the prism of such Western philosophers as Rousseau, Schiller, Kierkegaard, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Bergson, and Heidegger. Some attention to Russian philosophy in relation to the Russian literary tradition.

RUSS 620/HIST 684: Russian History Memoirs 1750-1920
Paul Bushkovitch (T 1:30-3:20)

The main trends in Russian history seen in the memoirs of the actors at various levels of society, from Catherine the Great to the Revolution. The advantages and limits of memoirs as historical sources as well as their importance in Russian culture.

RUSS 695/FILM 778: Russian Literature and Film in the 1920s and 1930s
Katerina Clark (T 1:30-3:20)

This course presents a historical overview, incorporating some of the main landmarks of the 1920s and 1930s including works by Pilnyak, Bakhtin, the Formalists, Platonov, Mayakovsky, Bulgakov, Zoshchenko, Eisenstein, Protazanov, Pudovkin, the Vasilyev “brothers,” and G. Aleksandrov.

RUSS 705: Life and Pop Culture in Late Imperial Moscow
Vladimir Alexandrov (T 1:30-3:20)

This seminar studies the texture of daily life and aspects of popular culture from the late nineteenth century to 1917 in Moscow, the city that many Russians considered the country’s “heart” and honored as its “second capital,” even two centuries after the founding of St. Petersburg. Readings include works of narrative and dramatic fiction (e.g., Boborykin, Gorky, Bunin, Shmelev), compilations (e.g., Povsednevnaia zhizn’ Moskvy: ocherki gorodskogo byta nachala XX veka), memoirs (e.g., A.F. Koshko, Ocherki ugolovnogo mira tsarskoi Rossii; V. Giliarovsky, Moskva i moskvichi), film (e.g. Evgenii Bauer, Posle smerti), and scholarly and historical studies (e.g., E. Uvarova, Kak razvlekalis’ v rossiiiskikh stolitsakh; P. Il’in and B. Rubl, eds., Moskva rubezha XIX i XX stoletii; V. Mikhailov, Rasskazy o kinematografe staroi Moskvy; selections from K. Baedeker, Russia 1914; selections from V. Alexandrov, The Black Russian).

RUSS 851: Proseminar in Russian Literature
Ilya Kliger (F 2:30-4:20)

Introduction to the graduate study of Russian literature. Topics include literary theory, methodology, introduction to the profession.